Midsize Sedan Buyer's Guide

Please view Greenlite Car Sales Midsize Sedan Buyer's Guide: More Car for Your Money
Content Provided by KBB.com

Roomy, comfortable, efficient, tech-savvy, and sometimes even fun to drive, today's midsize sedans deliver more bang for the buck than perhaps any other category of vehicles. It's no wonder they remain among the top-selling cars in the country.


2018 Chevrolet Malibu
Starting Price: $22,555
Totally rethought for 2016, the Malibu is roomier, more stylish and more tech savvy than ever before.


2018 Ford Fusion
Starting Price: $23,090
The boldly styled Fusion continues to turn heads and win buyers with its good looks.


2018 Honda Accord
Starting Price: $24,465
All-new for 2018, this is the most advanced, most refined Accord to date.


2018 Hyundai Sonata
Starting Price: $22,935
With a low starting price and excellent warranty coverage, the roomy and feature-filled Sonata is a better and better value.



2018 Kia Optima
Starting Price: $23,495
The Optima mixes a sporty and stylish persona with established value.


2018 Mazda Mazda6
Starting Price:$23,890
Arguably the most stylish, most fun-to-drive midsize sedan, a more powerful turbocharged engine and updated styling make the Mazda6 even more appealing for 2018. 


2018 Nissan Altima
Starting Price: $24,145
Nissan's popular midsize sedan trails only Camry and Accord in annual sales.


2018 Subaru Legacy
Starting Price: $23,055
The Legacy's claim to fame remains its standard all-wheel drive, but its stellar reputation for reliability is equally compelling.


2018 Toyota Camry
Starting Price: $24,530
All-new for 2018, the venerable Camry is as easy to drive and reliable as ever, but with a new sense of style and sportiness.


2018 Volkswagen Passat
Starting Price: $23,845
The only European entry in the segment, the roomy, comfortable Passat is also a pleasure to drive. 




Best Buy
On the strength of its stellar reputation for quality and value, the 2018 Honda Accord was named the Kelley Blue Book Midsize Car Best Buy of 2018, as well as the Overall Best Buy of 2018. 

Broad Appeal
You'll find six of these midsize sedans on our most recent list of 10 Best Sedans Under $25,000 and six on our collection of 10 Most Comfortable Cars Under $30,000.

What's New
Following a relatively quiet 2017 model year for the segment, 2018 brings with it complete redesigns of both the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry. And while not a full redesign, the Hyundai Sonata has been significantly updated for 2018, as has the Mazda6.

Resale Value Recognition
The Subaru Legacy is a perennial resale value standout, and it took home our most recent Best Resale Value Award in the Mid-Size Car category. Following in the second and third spots were the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry.


Source: KBB.com (January 4, 2018)

Basic Car Maintenance Schedule

Please view Greenlite Car Sales Basic Car Maintenance Schedule
Content Provided by AdvancedAutoParts.com

You're familiar with the old 3,000 vs. 5,000 miles oil change debate. And when your headlights dim, you change them out right away. But do you know how often you should flush your vehicle's transmission fluids or check the radiator belts and hoses?

If you answered, "Sure, when something goes wrong," you aren't alone. One way to keep it all straight is to follow a basic car maintenance schedule. You'll find one in your owner's manual or you can create a customized car maintenance list through the non-profit Car Care Council.


BASIC CAR MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE
CHECK MONTHLY
Check engine light (is it on?)
Cleaning interior and exterior
Lights
Tire inflation, tread, and general condition
Windshield washer fluid

CHECK EVERY 3 MONTHS/3,000 MILES
  • Automatic transmission fluid
  • Battery and cables
  • Belts
  • Check engine light (is it on?)
  • Engine oil and filter
  • Exhaust
  • Fuel filter
  • Hoses
  • Lights
  • Power steering fluid
  • Tire inflation, tread, and general condition
  • Windshield washer fluid

CHECK EVERY 6 MONTHS/6,000 MILES
  • Automatic transmission fluid
  • Battery and cables
  • Belts
  • Chassis lubrication
  • Check engine light (is it on?)
  • Polish
  • Engine air filter
  • Engine oil and filter
  • Exhaust
  • Fuel filter
  • Hoses
  • Lights
  • Power steering fluid
  • Tire inflation, tread, and general condition
  • Windshield washer fluid
  • Wiper blades

CHECK EVERY 9 MONTHS/9,000 MILES
  • Automatic transmission fluid
  • Battery and cables
  • Belts
  • Check engine light (is it on?)
  • Engine air filter
  • Engine oil and filter
  • Exhaust
  • Fuel Filter
  • Hoses
  • Lights
  • Power steering fluid
  • Tire inflation, tread, and general condition
  • Windshield washer fluid

CHECK EVERY 12 MONTHS/12,000 MILES
  • Automatic transmission fluid
  • Battery and cables
  • Belts
  • Brakes
  • Cabin air filter
  • Check engine light (is it on?)
  • Polish
  • Coolant (Antifreeze)
  • Engine air filter
  • Engine oil and filter
  • Exhaust
  • Fuel filter
  • Hoses
  • Lights
  • Power steering fluid
  • Steering and suspension
  • Tire inflation, tread, and general condition
  • Windshield washer fluid
  • Wiper blades

Now that you know what needs to happen and when, don't forget to record all your hard work in a vehicle maintenance log. Use any of the smartphone apps out there or an old school notebook that you keep tucked away in your glove box. Either way, keeping track of basic maintenance and repairs will give you a clearer picture of your vehicle's overall health.

Source: AdvancedAutoParts.com (June 20, 2018)

Pickup Truck Buying Guide

Please view Greenlite Car Sales Pickup Truck Buying Guide
Content Provided by ConsumerReports.org

Trucks are big, bold, and highly capable, making it easy and tempting to buy too much machine. A good place to start when selecting a pickup truck is with a realistic assessment of your actual needs. If you’re not planning to carry multi-ton loads or pull a very heavy trailer, you probably don’t need a full-sized, heavy-duty pickup truck. A lighter-duty full-sized truck or even a compact/midsized pickup should fit the bill. If you don’t need to haul dirty cargo such as construction debris, mulch, or manure, another vehicle type, such as a minivan or an SUV, could be a better choice. If you only need a pickup once in a while, for some specific task, you might be better off renting one for these occasions rather than buying one and making it do double duty as a family car. 


What to Know
If the truck will serve as both a workhorse and a family transport, though, then consider an extended-cab or crew-cab model with four doors. That’s probably the most common configuration these days. If you plan to drive in snow, deep mud, or more than a short distance off road, you should choose four-wheel drive.

Pickup trucks come in endless permutations: full-sized or compact; long bed or short; regular, extended, or crew cab; two door or four; two- or four-wheel drive; standard or automatic transmission; and so on. Engines range from small four-cylinders and V6s to V8s and big diesels. Base prices range from $20,000 to almost $60,000.

Pickup Nomenclature
Full-sized pickups, sometimes called half-ton trucks—by far the biggest-selling type—carry the designation 1500 in the case of the Chevrolet Silverado, GMC Sierra, and Ram, and 150 in Ford’s parlance. Heavier-duty trucks are designated 2500, 3500 (or F-250, F-350), and so forth. The terms “half-ton” for the 1500s and “three-quarter-ton” for the 2500s are widely used, obsolete holdovers from decades ago when the number referred to the maximum cargo weight capacity. Conversationally, the 2500-series and heavier trucks are known as “heavy duty,” but that’s not technically correct, either. The U.S. government considers any truck that weighs less than 14,000 pounds, including 3500-series, to be a light-duty truck. But we’ll continue to refer to 2500-series trucks as “heavy duty” because they are serious workhorses.

Considering their vast sales volumes, there aren’t all that many pickup truck brands to choose from. Ford and Chevrolet/GMC are the largest sellers, followed by Ram (formerly known as Dodge). The Japanese brands have a smaller role, led by Toyota and, with far fewer sales, Nissan and Honda. Hyundai is expected to join the segment.


Key Things to Consider
Even within the variety of basic configurations, pickups can differ greatly in price, fuel economy, comfort, performance, safety, and reliability. Some of those factors can be interlinked. The best fuel economy goes hand in hand with lighter weight, smaller size, and modest power. Likewise, a heavy trailer demands a heavy truck, with an accompanying fuel-economy penalty. Plus, in our testing, we find that the more heavy-duty a truck is, the worse it tends to ride. The most capable trucks have dual rear wheels, with rear fenders that stick out about 8 inches from either side of the truck. These extreme machines are difficult to maneuver.

With pickup trucks, it is important to buy what you need, resisting the urge to overdo it. While it may be tempting to have extra cargo and towing capacity, you’ll pay for it both up front and through compromises (such as ride and fuel economy) over time.

The open cargo bed lends itself to serious chores, such as moving large appliances, bulky furniture, tools or equipment, motorcycles, snow blowers, and outdoors-only cargo, such as wood chips, manure, and trash. These are tasks you wouldn’t want to (or couldn’t) do with a minivan or an SUV.

Pickup trucks are also well-suited to towing boats, cars, utility trailers, and campers. Manufacturer specifications for the vehicle and its driveline will note maximum cargo weight and towing capacities. You can choose original equipment manufacturer (OEM) towing packages or buy aftermarket equipment. Buying from the factory is the best choice because installation might involve complex wiring for the trailer brakes and lights, special attachment points for the tow hitch, and accessories such as a heavy-duty alternator and a transmission oil cooler. Further, the manufacturer-engineered packages come backed by the factory warranty. Many, but not all, pickups can be ordered with a trailer brake controller.

While pickup trucks have impressive abilities, they also have inherent drawbacks. For example, they tend to guzzle gas whether they’re loaded or not. For gasoline-powered full-sized trucks, 14 to 17 mpg overall is par for the course. Half-ton diesel models are also available and can deliver around 20 mpg. For a compact truck such as a Chevrolet Colorado or Toyota Tacoma, figure 18 to 20 mpg. Of course, the mileage only goes down when the vehicles are carrying cargo or pulling a trailer.

Among other considerations, the open bed leaves cargo vulnerable to the weather or theft. Access to a tall cabin can be difficult (consider side steps on 4WD models), and the side rails of full-sized truck beds are so high off the ground that loading and retrieving heavy items over the side is awkward, tiresome, and/or inconvenient. (Some models now have integrated steps in the bumper or folding steps on the tailgate to make access easier for shorter owners.)

Trucks don’t tend to have the most comfortable ride, though the ride does smooth out when they are carrying cargo in the bed. And the latest-generation trucks have seen the rides improved markedly. “Trucklike” isn’t nearly the insult it once was. If you choose a handy extended cab or spacious crew cab, you might have to put up with a short load bed, typically 5 feet, which limits what you can carry. But a full-length bed, typically 8 feet, makes for a very long, hard-to-park vehicle if that bed is added to an extended-cab truck.

Ultimately, the most practical strategy for selecting a pickup is to find a truck that meets your requirements without buying more than you need. Consider starting with our lists of recommended trucks and working your way up the line from the smallest and least costly.


What You’ll Spend
Pickup truck prices vary widely, from about $20,000 for the most basic model to $60,000 or more. For well-equipped, 4WD trucks geared for family use, figure on about $35,000-plus for a compact truck, at least mid-$40s for a full-sized model, and $55,000 for a heavy-duty diesel pickup truck. 


Source: ConsumerReports.org (October 2017)

28th Annual Nashville Auto Fest - Jan. 19-20, 2019

Please view Greenlite Car Sales 28th Annual Nashville Auto Fest - Jan. 19-20, 2019
Content Provided by NashvilleAutoFest.com


28th Annual Edition
Saturday & Sunday January 19-20, 2019
The Fairgrounds Nashville

It's official! The 28th edition of the Nashville Auto Fest will be held at The Fairgrounds Nashville!

We are working on great new events, new attractions, new show car classifications, and increases in awards, cash and prizes! Keep tuned for more updates!

Fun for the entire family


PRESS RELEASE:

O'REILLY AUTO PARTS JOINS THE NASHVILLE AUTO FEST
NASHVILLE — O'Reilly Auto Parts teamed with the city's largest auto show to become the presenting sponsor of the 26th annual Nashville Auto Fest, officials with the event announced. The annual Auto Fest, a combination car show and swap meet event, is slated for January 19-20, at The Fairgrounds Nashville. More than $2,000 in cash and awards will be given out during the event.

Source: NashvilleAutoFest.com (2018)
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